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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

1 edition of Maximum total uranium solubility under conditions expected in a nuclear waste vault found in the catalog.

Maximum total uranium solubility under conditions expected in a nuclear waste vault

Maximum total uranium solubility under conditions expected in a nuclear waste vault

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  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. in Ottawa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radioactive waste disposal

  • Edition Notes

    11

    The Physical Object
    Pagination36 p.
    Number of Pages36
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22012033M

    @article{osti_, title = {Characteristics of colloids generated during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses in groundwater}, author = {Feng, X and Buck, E C and Mertz, C and Bates, J K and Cunnane, J C and Chaiko, D}, abstractNote = {Aqueous colloidal suspensions were generated by reacting nuclear waste glasses with groundwater at 90{degrees}C at different ratios of the glass . Radioactive wastes are generated during nuclear fuel cycle operation, production and application of radioisotope in medicine, industry, research, and agriculture, and as a byproduct of natural resource exploitation, which includes mining and processing of ores, combustion of fossil fuels, or production of natural gas and oil. To ensure the protection of human health and the environment from.

    The present work deals with the extraction of neptunium into the TBP/dodecane phase under conditions relevant to highly radioactive waste solutions, along with uranium and plutonium, by oxidizing it to the hexavalent state using M K{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7} and subsequently recovering it . The package-scale calculations consider only the local NRVB and its reactions with materials associated with the specified package and waste stream. The total volumes of NRVB plus waste considered are of the order of , m 3 for the vaults, and range from m 3 to 48 m 3 for the various package types. For direct comparison of the vault.

    Safety and economics of uranium utilization for nuclear power generation were investigated and discussed. In order to sustain energy supply with nuclear power generation, uranium resources should be abundant. From the viewpoint of depletion of the resources, fast breeder reactor (FBR), which is breeder reactor of plutonium, has been developed. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, protecting people and the environment.


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Maximum total uranium solubility under conditions expected in a nuclear waste vault Download PDF EPUB FB2

B.W. GoodwinMaximum total uranium solubility under conditions expected in a nuclear waste vault (56th ed.), TR, Atomic Energy of Canada, Ottawa () Google ScholarCited by: Uranium solubilities of the order of 10−10 M have been calculated for a range of conditions which are considered to be representative of those expected in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal.

The rate of dissolution of unirradiated UO2 fuel pellets under mildly oxidizing conditions has been investigated. A static leaching procedure was used Cited by: Understanding the water solubility of plutonium and uranium compounds and residues at TA is necessary to provide a technical basis for appropriate criticality safety, safety basis and accountability controls.

Individual compound solubility was determined using published solubility data and solution thermodynamic modeling. The study demonstrates that maximum U concentrations in the groundwater of the Tono Uranium Deposit appear to be limited by the solubility of the amorphous, hydrous oxide UO 2 (am).

This conclusion supports the assumption that the solubility of UO 2 (am), or an analogous UO 2 solid, would limit the aqueous concentrations of U released from an Cited by: 2. There is a large body of evidence demonstrating that, for more oxidizing conditions, the dissolution of fuel must be considered as an electrochemical process and therefore treated kinetically 5, The dissolution reaction of UO 2 is a coupled process under oxidizing conditions involving the oxidative dissolution of the UO 2 and the reduction of the available oxidant: (1) UO 2 →UO 2+ 2 +2e.

The solubility of uranium and thorium has been measured under the conditions anticipated in a cementitious, geological disposal facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. The oxidative dissolution of UO 2 has been studied in NaClO 4 and Na 2 SO 4 solutions as a function of pH over a range of ⩽ pH ⩽ 12 using a combination of electrochemical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic techniques.

The relative stability and solubility of solid uranium oxides and uranium speciation in aqueous solutions were examined using thermodynamic calculations. Initial conditions in a Canadian used fuel disposal vault would combine a maximum temperature of about 95°C and a maximum radiation dose rate of 52 Gy h −1 at the waste container surface, with a maximum pressure in the buffer and backfill materials of ∼12 MPa.

These conditions may not be extreme enough to inhibit the survival of either. Uranium is a chemical element with the symbol U and atomic number It is a silvery-grey metal in the actinide series of the periodic table.A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence m is weakly radioactive because all isotopes of uranium are unstable; the half-lives of its naturally occurring isotopes range betweenyears and billion years.

Oxidation and dissolution rates of UO2(s) in carbonate-rich solutions under external alpha irradiation and initially reducing conditions Article (PDF Available) in Radiochimica Acta A two-dimensional model has been developed to simulate the corrosion of nuclear fuel pellets under permanent waste disposal conditions in a steel vessel with a corrosion-resistant copper shell.

Nuclear Waste—A View from Washington, D.C. MIKE MCCORMACK Chap DOI: /bkch Publication Date (Print): March 8, Some waste packages will contain a significant amount of cellulosic material that may undergo alkaline degradation under the repository conditions.

The result of this chemical decomposition is a complex mixture of water-soluble organic compounds that may affect both the solubility of key radionuclides and also their sorption behaviour. In the United States, each waste package is expected to include a high-integrity container capable of providing up to 1, years of total containment.

The current design for the Yucca Mountain repository allows for a total of 70, metric tons uranium (MTU) w MTU of spent fuel.

The solubility of thorium increases in acidic aqueous solutions, and so tailings solutions can contain very high concentrations of Th under acid-generating conditions. Radium in mill tailings can be adsorbed or co-precipitated with Fe-Mn hydrous oxides, gypsum, barite, or amorphous silica under oxidizing conditions, keeping Ra.

The nuclear fuel cycle describes the series of industrial processes that produce electricity from uranium fuel—typically uranium oxide (UO 2)—in nuclear power 1 demonstrates the different types of wastes that are produced throughout the nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining, milling, conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication (front-end processes) to the so-called back.

The disposition of actinides, most recently Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons, requires effective containment of waste generated by the nuclear fuel cycle.

Because actinides (e.g., Pu and Np) are long-lived, they have a major impact on risk assessments of geologic repositories. Thus, demonstrable, long-term chemical and mechanical durability are essential properties of waste forms.

The Salina beds dip southward at a low angle. The dip is variable, averaging from 50 to feet per mile, depending on the local structural conditions. At its maximum, the Salina is about 1, feet in thickness.

The salt may be present in several beds. Its total thickness is more than feet in central New York, south of Syracuse. Shoesmith, D.W. and S. Sunder. “Prediction of Nuclear Fuel (UO 2) Dissolution Under Waste Disposal Conditions,” J.

Nucl. Mat.SKB [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.]. Long-Term Safety for KBS-3 Repositories at Forsmark and Laxemar–A First Evaluation. SKB TR, SKB, Stockholm, Sweden. The primary interest was the sorption behavior under tank closure conditions where the tanks will be filled with reducing cementitious materials.

Because there were no laboratory studies conducted using site specific experimental conditions, (e.g., high pH and HLW tank aqueous and solid phase chemical conditions), it was necessary to extend the.and SYVAC-Vault models (SVM) in order to assess concurrance.

Specifically, the effects of precipitation and decay chain in-growth on the predicted release of nuclides from waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel were compared between each code. The results for maximum release rates generally agreed within a factor of Australia: natural, soluble and insoluble compounds, mg/cu m, as U; STEL mg/cu m, as U (); Federal Republic of Germany: uranium compounds, mg/cu m total dust, as U; short-term level mg/cu m total dust, as U, 30 min, once per shift; due to natural radioactivity of uranium, the tolerance value of the "Strahlenschutzverordnung.