Last edited by Jukasa
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of overview of major wetland functions and values found in the catalog.

overview of major wetland functions and values

J. Henry Sather

overview of major wetland functions and values

by J. Henry Sather

  • 33 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by The Team in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Wetland ecology -- United States.,
    • Wetlands -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby J. Henry Sather, R. Daniel Smith ; performed for Western Energy and Land Use Team, Division of Biological Services, Research and Development, Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of Interior.
      ContributionsSmith, R. Daniel., Western Energy and Land Use Team.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQH104 .S28 1984
      The Physical Object
      Paginationiv, 68 p.
      Number of Pages68
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3001288M
      LC Control Number84603864

      • Most wetlands perform multiple functions • All wetlands perform at least one function • Even small wetlands can provide high value (e.g., vernal pools) • A wetland’s performance of a function may vary with season, and from year to year. Common Questions: Definition of the Terms Wetland “Function” and “Value” 3 The first set of wetland characteristics are the natural processes occurring within wetlands such as denitrification, biomass production, and flow retardation. As indicated above, the HGM report referred to such natural processes as “functions”.

      Thus, a connection can be made between the functions of wetlands, which are value-neutral, and to goods and services, which have value to society. Because value is a societal perception, it often changes over time, even if wetland functions are constant. It also can change over time, for example. But the marginal value of wetlands increases with human development (agricultural and urban) only to a point as wetland functions begin to be lost. For example, far ranging mammals are eliminated as wetlands become smaller sized and fragmented; aquatic species are lost as wetlands Cited by:

      Overview of the overall wetland management planning process 1. Introduction 2. The need for management planning Knowing the wetland and its values Overview Contents. WETLAND MANAGEMENT PLANNING: a guide for Appendix B. Suggested (but not exhaustive) list of wetland features and functions to assist in preparing a wetland site. Jan 28,  · This chapter discusses the importance of watershed management and provides an overview of projects that have enhanced or restored the functions and values of wetlands and watercourses, including.


Share this book
You might also like
Waitress! Theres an eye in my soup!

Waitress! Theres an eye in my soup!

Tombola

Tombola

Southwold Railway Centenary

Southwold Railway Centenary

Bugs in the program

Bugs in the program

First report of the All Wales Nurse Manpower Planning Committee.

First report of the All Wales Nurse Manpower Planning Committee.

The loyalist poetry of the revolution

The loyalist poetry of the revolution

Acute conditions, incidence and associated disability, United States, July 1972-June 1973

Acute conditions, incidence and associated disability, United States, July 1972-June 1973

principles of wort circulation

principles of wort circulation

Approaches to improving the quality of life

Approaches to improving the quality of life

Concerto for horn and orchestra.

Concerto for horn and orchestra.

Wilmington coal fauna, and additions to the Wilmington coal flora from a Pennsylvanian deposit in Will County, Illinois.

Wilmington coal fauna, and additions to the Wilmington coal flora from a Pennsylvanian deposit in Will County, Illinois.

Every girls book of sex.

Every girls book of sex.

J.M. Synge and modern comedy

J.M. Synge and modern comedy

Toenails

Toenails

Overview of major wetland functions and values by J. Henry Sather Download PDF EPUB FB2

Literature as it pertains to the following major wetland functions: ground water recharge and discharge; flood storage and desynchronization; and shoreline anchoring and dissipation of erosive virtuosobs.com by: Overview of major wetland functions and values.

Washington, DC: The Team, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: J Henry Sather; R Daniel Smith; Western Energy and Land Use Team.

The Wetland Book is a comprehensive resource aimed at supporting the trans- and multidisciplinary research and practice which is inherent to this field. Aware both that wetlands research is on the rise and that researchers and students are often working or learning across several disciplines.

Part or all of this report is presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). For best results viewing and printing PDF documents, it is recommended that you download the overview of major wetland functions and values book to your computer and open them with Adobe Reader.

The physical, chemical, and biological interactions within wetlands are often referred to as wetland functions. These functions include surface and subsurface water storage, nutrient cycling, particulate removal, maintenance of plant and animal communities, water filtration or purification, and groundwater recharge.

Wetland functions have value on several levels-internal, local, regional, and global. All wetland functions are internal, but the values or benefits of wetland functions can be internal or external to the wetland. Functions that provide internal values are the functions that maintain or sustain the wetland and are essential to the continued existence of the wetland.

What are wetland functions and values. Great Blue Heron 2 Wetland functions and values form a very important part of Section permit decisions by the Corps. Functions are self-sustaining properties of a wetland ecosystem that exist in the absence of society.

Functions result from both living and non-living components of a specific wetland. Wetland Functions and Values Wetlands can be thought of as “biological supermarkets.” They produce great quantities of food that attract many animal species (Figure 1).

Quantitative assessment of wetland functions is critical for. the successful implementation of the environmental assessment mitigation hierarchy of. avoidance, minimisation, and compensation of impacts on wetlands from proposed projects.

It is important to distinguish between wetland function and wetland values. Most Important Functions and Services of Wetlands. According to the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust, presently 75% of the human population lives in former wetlands and surrounding areas.

Wetlands have provided people with various products and services since time immemorial. The major functions of wetlands are as follows: (1) flood control; (2) ground water recharge; (3) water filtration and purifica- tion; (4) wildlife habitat; (5) shoreline anchoring and erosion control; (6) recreation; and (7) education and research.

The Wetland Conservation (WC) provisions, commonly referred to as Swampbuster, prohibit USDA program participants from converting remaining wetlands on their agricultural operations to cropland, pasture, or hay land unless the wetland acres, functions, and values are compensated for through wetland mitigation.

Wetlands provide many functions that differ by wetland type and landscape setting. It is difficult to put an economic, societal, and environmental value on wetlands, and even more difficult to put a dollar figure on individual functions provided by different wetland types.

Wetlands can receive, store, and release water in various ways-- physically through ground water and surface water, as well as biologically through transpiration by vegetation -- and therefore function in this very important global cycle. Some specific examples of the benefits of wetlands.

The value of a wetland is a measure of its importance to society. Wetland functions are valued to various degrees by society, but there is no precise, general relationship between wetland functions and the value of wetlands to society, and values can be difficult to determine objectively.

Wetlands serve many functions and values that often go unnoticed. They are particularly valuable components of the ecosystem. Much of this stems from their habitat for fish and wildlife, as well as for protecting water quality, erosion prevention, flood storage and recreation.

A complete list of all the important Wetlands Functions and Values in this module Test Your Knowledge. Acknowledgments. The text of this module was derived, with substantial modifications and additions, from two EPA publications, America's Wetlands: Our Vital Link Between Land and Water () and Wetlands Fact Sheets ().

Other references. and Values Assessment is intended to aid in determining the wetland functions and values that be may impacted and/or altered as a result of the Project’s construction and operation. The functions and values of wetlands are the favorable roles that a wetland provides to its surrounding.

Wetland functions are those processes that wetlands perform independent of human opinion, such as nutrient cycling, floodflow alteration, sediment stabilization, and providing plant and animal habitat. Wetland values are a measurement of the benefit these wetland functions provide to society.

WETLANDS CONSERVATION: METHODS, FUNCTIONS, USES AND VALUES Introduction ‘Value’ is an anthropocentric concept as it depends upon the perception or judgment of the human society about the usefulness of something.

The goods and services provided by an ecosystem are then considered as values. All values are derived from. † Indirect values: wetland ecological functions which maintain and protect natural calculating and articulating the value of wetland goods and services, a major Overview Economic.Wetlands Functions and Values discussed in this module appear in bold, grey text.

Protecting wetlands can, in turn, protect our health and safety by reducing flood .Wetlands typically comprise a major portion of the fish and wildlife habitat restoration projects currently being planned by Corps districts.

However, additional wetland functions such as improvement of water quality are becoming increasingly recognized for their importance in many Corps' programs.